PROJECTS

RESEARCH PROJECTS
  • 2018
    now
    Gif-sur-Yvette, France

    EBRAINS Live Papers

    Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, Institut des Neurosciences Paris-Saclay

    Position: Postdoctoral Researcher
    Mentor: Dr. Andrew Davison, Neuro-PSI (UNIC), CNRS

    Funding agency: European Union’s Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation under Specific Grant Agreements No. 785907 and No. 945539 (Human Brain Project SGA2 and SGA3)

    Computational approaches to neuroscience, such as development of models and data analysis, lack an established system for distributing code, data and other related resources. The absence of such a system significantly diminishes the utility of scientific outputs such as published models and datasets within the neuroscience community, and also hinders the reproducibility of data analyses. This has also severely impeded the promotion and progress of community-based, collaborative modelling efforts. We have developed an online platform, called EBRAINS Live Papers, for sharing scientific resources in neuroscience. It aims to enable researchers to easily access the data resources employed in published studies and understand in detail the provenance of published results and figures.
  • 2017
    now
    Gif-sur-Yvette, France

    Model Representation and Standards

    Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, Institut des Neurosciences Paris-Saclay

    Position: Postdoctoral Researcher
    Mentor: Dr. Andrew Davison, Neuro-PSI (UNIC), CNRS

    Funding agency: European Union’s Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation under Specific Grant Agreements No. 720270 and No. 785907 (Human Brain Project SGA1 and SGA2)

    Work with community partners and with model developers to adopt and/or develop standards for representing brain models, and for sharing them. Specifically, develop open APIs for morphology analysis, classification, conversion, and manipulation; establish open standards for performant, interoperable model representations (from the cellular-level to the point neuron levels); develop open APIs to access information on models; and work to create representations for models of synaptic plasticity. Work with others to ensure that the APIs and model representations are consistent with high performance on both traditional HPC and neuromorphic computing systems. As far as possible use and/or extend existing community standards (e.g. NeuroML, NineML, PyNN).
  • 2017
    now
    Gif-sur-Yvette, France

    Validation Framework Services and Apps

    Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, Institut des Neurosciences Paris-Saclay

    Position: Postdoctoral Researcher
    Mentor: Dr. Andrew Davison, Neuro-PSI (UNIC), CNRS

    Funding agency: European Union’s Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation under Specific Grant Agreements No. 720270 and No. 785907 (Human Brain Project SGA1 and SGA2)

    Develop services and apps facilitating community model-building and community validation of models, and use them to perform preliminary validations of these models. The work to be performed includes enhancements of the existing validation framework in collaboration with corresponding other HBP tasks; tools facilitating web access to validation experiments and their results; and outreach activities. In addition, work actively to build community support with a special emphasis on validation experiments coming from the community. The apps developed will make a fundamental contribution to community-driven modelling, and will encourage community-driven app development.
  • 2010
    2016
    Mumbai, India

    Computational Modeling of Bladder Smooth Muscle

    IIT Bombay

    Position: Research Scholar
    Mentor: Prof. Rohit Manchanda, IIT Bombay

    Funding agency: Department of Biotechnology (DBT), India [BT/PR12973/MED/122/47/2016] and the UK-India Education and Research Initiative (UKIERI) [UKUTP20110055]

    Certain smooth muscles, such as the detrusor of the urinary bladder, exhibit a variety of spikes that differ markedly in their amplitudes and time courses. The origin of this diversity is poorly understood but is often attributed to the syncytial nature of smooth muscle and its distributed innervation.
    In order to help clarify such issues, we developed a three-dimensional electrical model of syncytial smooth muscle implemented using the compartmental modeling technique, with special reference to the bladder detrusor. Values of model parameters were sourced or derived from experimental data. The model was validated against various modes of stimulation employed experimentally and the results were found to accord with both theoretical predictions and experimental observations. Model outputs also satisfied criteria characteristic of electrical syncytia, such as correlation between the spatial spread and temporal decay of electrotonic potentials as well as positively skewed amplitude frequency histogram for sub-threshold potentials, and lead to interesting conclusions.
    Based on analysis of syncytia of different sizes, it was found that a size of 21-cube may be considered the critical minimum size for an electrically infinite syncytium. Set against experimental results, we conjecture the existence of electrically sub-infinite bundles in the detrusor. Moreover, the absence of coincident activity between closely spaced cells potentially implies, counter-intuitively, highly efficient electrical coupling between such cells. The model thus provided a heuristic platform for the interpretation of electrical activity in syncytial tissues.
    A number of enhancements and extensions to the basic model had been developed and discussed, to obtain a better understanding of syncytial tissues. These include the investigation of initiation, propagation and modulation of action potentials in a syncytium and the development of a physiologically more realistic gap junction model. Relevance to physiological function were discussed, and their implications assessed, at each stage.
COURSE PROJECTS
  • 2010
    2010
    Mumbai, India

    Virtual Instrumentation for Real Time ECG Signal Processing

    IIT Bombay

    Guide: Prof. Soumyo Mukherji, IIT Bombay
    Topped course & awarded ‘AA’ grade; Appointed Head Teaching Assistant
  • 2010
    2010
    Mumbai, India

    Molecular Classification of Cancer by Gene Expression Monitoring

    IIT Bombay

    Guide: Prof. Subramani Arunkumar, IIT Bombay
    Seminar on same topic awarded ‘AA’ grade
  • 2010
    2010
    Mumbai, India

    Micro-machined Retinal Prosthesis

    IIT Bombay

    Guide: Prof. Rohit Srivastava, IIT Bombay
    Awarded ‘AA’ grade in course
  • 2009
    2009
    Mumbai, India

    Computational Methods for Cancer Gene Identification and Classification

    IIT Bombay

    Guide: Prof. Pramod Wangikar, IIT Bombay
    Selected as one of the best projects & awarded ‘AA’ grade
  • 2007
    2008
    Navi Mumbai, India

    Commutation Information System (CIS)

    SIES Graduate School of Technology

    Guide: Prof. Aparna Bannore, SIES Graduate School of Technology
    Worked with support from local transport networks